Course Syllabus

SOC 1 Introduction to Sociology / Summer 2019

Sections 8638 [Online] & 8697 [MTWs]

Dr. John Stover / Department of Behavioral Sciences

Santa Rosa Junior College – Petaluma Campus

Instructor Information

Professor: John A Stover, PhD aka Dr. John

E-mail: jstover@santarosa.edu

Mobile/Text: 415-596-1524 (preferred / 140 characters)

Office Phone: 707-778-3655 (text or call my cell first!)

Office Locales: PC 668 CALL (Petaluma) and Also on Zoom @ https://zoom.us/j/3568603460

Zoom Information: Personal Meeting ID 356-860-3460 and https://zoom.us/j/3568603460

Office Hours [Updated]:

...Week One: 12:50 to 1:30pm and By Appointment ONLY

...Weeks Two Thru Six: MTWs 1:00--2:00pm, Thursdays 10:00am--Noon, anytime via text/mobile

Course Information

SOC 1 Introduction (Intro) to Sociology Three lecture hours per week

Section 8638 Details: Online Course, June 17th to July 28th.

Section 8697 Details: MTWs 10:00am—12:50pm, PC 698 CALL, June 17th to July 24th. 

Welcome Aboard! What is Sociology, Anyway?

So·ci·ol·o·gy. Function: noun.

Etymology: French sociologie, from socio- + -logie –logy.

  1. the science of society, social institutions, and social relationships; specifically: the systematic study of the development, structure, interaction, and collective behavior of organized groups of human beings.
  2. the scientific analysis of a social institution as a functioning whole and as it relates to the rest of society.[1]

[1] Merriam-Webster Website http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sociology accessed 6 August 2017.

Introduction to Sociology is an undergraduate, introductory course exploring the perspectives for understanding human interaction as based on the analysis of people, organizational structures, and the cultures and societies in which they are found. During the length of this course, you will develop your own sociological understanding of the world, or what C. Wright Mills termed The Sociological Imagination. You will also refine skills related to active reading, analytical writing, and media critique. We’ll apply in-class studies to observations, participation, and interactions in the world in which we live, and you will contribute to discussions and analyses. The course is designed to answer these three, major questions: What is Sociology as a Discipline? How Can we Combat Both Individual and Structural Inequalities? How are Societies Changing in a Globalized World?

Student Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain and apply the major theories, concepts, and methodologies of sociology.
  2. Analyze society and social groups using a sociological perspective.
  3. Evaluate structures and policies of major American social institutions.

Course Catalog Description

An exploration of American society from several levels of analysis including face-to-face social interaction, groups, and institutions. This exploration is accomplished through the use of lectures, small group interaction, multimedia, and guest speaker presentations.

The official COURSE OUTLINE for SOC 1 is ALSO available online at http://ow.ly/lnF730dep4g

Recommended Preparation & Transferability

  • Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent (Grade or P/NO)
  • Transfer: CSU;UC. C-ID: SOCI 110.

Course Materials - WHAT You'll Need

If purchasing books is a hardship, I can help. Contact me right away for assistance.

  1. [Required/Available for Purchase] Ali, Syed and Phillip Cohen (Editors), & ASA. 2018. The CONTEXTS Reader (Third Edition). New York, NY: WW Norton and Company. ISBN: 978–0393–6365–0.
  2. [Required/Available for Purchase] Rios, Victor. 2011. Street Life: Poverty, Gangs, and a PhD. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. ISBN 978–1–45383–269–1.
  3. [Additional Resource/Free to Students Online] [Online Textbook] OER Resource & Rice University. 2015. Introduction to Sociology 2e. OpenStax. Print: 978–1–938168–41–3 / Free PDF: 978–1–947172–11–1
  4. [Required for on-ground students, available for pick up for online students] [Workbook] Stover, John and Nori Lowe Henk. 2018. The Sociology Workbook. Self-Published/Supplied by the Instructor (see below).
  5. I’ll also provide PDF articles periodically.

Course Materials - HOW You'll Use Them

  1. [The CONTEXTS Reader] This reader will form the basis of many of our discussions (both on-ground and online). You will want to purchase/rent this book RIGHT AWAY as we’ll start using it during WEEK ONE of our studies.
  2. [Street Life] This is the super engaging, easy read, and inspiring life story of Dr. Victor Rios, a Superstar Sociologist with an amazing life story and incredible, groundbreaking scholarship. We’ll get into this book around Week Three of the Summer.
  3. [Online Textbook] The online textbook is an ADDITIONAL resource provided to all students for their use in cross-referencing terms, themes, and ideas covered in the lectures, readings, and activities I design. The textbook is for YOU to use AS YOU SEE FIT – I will not be covering the textbook specifically in my lectures or activities. It is a REFERENCE TOOL for you to use if you need additional support, explanation, or clarification (see also below).
  4. [The Sociology Workbook] [FOR ON-GROUND STUDENTS] On-ground students will be provided with the workbook on Days One/Two of the course. On-ground students will use the workbook EVERY DAY and will be assessed on their use / engagement throughout the semester. [FOR ONLINE STUDENTS] Online students have the OPTION of picking up a copy of the workbook during my office hours if they so choose. Module Pages will reflect the Workbook Structure electronically for online students, so don’t worry if you don’t pick up a hard copy. Since all of your assessments are online, the workbook is an OPTIONAL tool for your note-taking.
  5. [PDF Readings] Some of the readings I provide as PDF files, all of which will be posted online and/or shared in on-ground classes.

Accessing the Free Online Textbook (Additional Resource)

The textbook is embedded in our Module Structure and Available Within Canvas!

I highly recommend using this way. 

You can also access the book/chapters via these links: 

You can use whichever formats you want. Web view is recommended -- the responsive design works seamlessly on any device.

Other Resources

Websites. You will need regular access to CANVAS @ https://canvas.santarosa.edu/login/canvas for assignment instructions, submitting assignments, sharing resources, and viewing grades. I ALSO STRONGLY RECOMMEND you take advantage of SRJC’s Tutorial Centers (https://college-skills.santarosa.edu/tutorial-centers), Learning Communities (https://learningcommunities.santarosa.edu/), and library resources (https://libraries.santarosa.edu/#research1). We will talk about each of these, too.

Software. For assigned PDF Readings you will need Adobe Reader, and for assignments and access to CANVAS you will need a computer with word processing and Internet access capabilities. Google Drive is an excellent resource for free, internet-based software for creating/writing papers, charts, and presentations. There are also many computers on campus, such as in the library, for your use.

Assessment Measures By Category & Related Points

Updated 26 June 2019

For Online Students:

All activities will be completed electronically.

Module Activities =

Around 50 points per Each Module / About 80% of your overall points

  • Discussions, Media Analyses, Short Essays, and Quizzes make up the majority of your class points.
  • With the exception of the Welcome Module, each Module is worth around 50 points.
  • Most modules will have a mix of activities, with the 50 associated points distributed across the activities. 
  • Some modules will be shorter and will include a 50 point quiz at the end. 
  • Regarding Quizzes
    • Module Quizzes will measure your ability to apply, interpret, and discuss key course themes. 
    • All readings, lectures, terms, concepts, media, and other course content are “fair game” for each quiz.
    • Module Quizzes will always be the LAST assignment to complete in each Module. 
    • Module Quizzes assigned during Weeks One thru Five of the Summer Semester ALWAYS MUST be completed no later than 11:59 pm on the Sunday after the material has been discussed.

Final Research Project and Presentations =

Around 200 points total / About 20% of your overall points

  • An important way in which we critically assess the information-rich society in which we live is by using the Sociological Imagination in our writing and research.
  • To this end, small groups of students will also research and present on a special topic for their final presentations.
  • Electronic presentations and Verbal Deliveries of your research will be required for all students. 
  • Online students will deliver all final products online.

 

For Onground Students

Activities will be completed in a variety of formats, including on Canvas, in-class, and in person.

Sociology in Action and Workbook Activities =

Around 50 points per Each Module / About 70% of your overall points

  • Discussions, Media Analyses, Short Essays, and Quizzes make up the majority of your class points.
  • With the exception of the Welcome Module, each Module is worth around 50 points.
  • Most modules will have a mix of activities, with the 50 associated points distributed across the activities. 
  • Some modules will be shorter and will include a 50 point quiz at the end. 
  • Regarding Quizzes
    • Module Quizzes will measure your ability to apply, interpret, and discuss key course themes. 
    • All readings, lectures, terms, concepts, media, and other course content are “fair game” for each quiz.
    • Module Quizzes will always be the LAST assignment to complete in each Module. 
    • Module Quizzes assigned during Weeks One thru Five of the Summer Semester ALWAYS MUST be completed no later than 11:59 pm on the Sunday after the material has been discussed.
  • Regarding the Workbook
    • Onground students will utilize "The Sociology Workbook" and WILL be graded on it.
    • The workbooks will be periodically graded on the quality, depth, and completion of their notes and activities.

Final Research Project and Presentations =

Around 200 points total / About 20% of your overall points

  • An important way in which we critically assess the information-rich society in which we live is by using the Sociological Imagination in our writing and research.
  • To this end, small groups of students will also research and present on a special topic for their final presentations.
  • Electronic presentations and Verbal Deliveries of your research will be required for all students. 
  • On-ground students will use multiple methods of submission, in person and online.

In-Class Participation = 10% of Overall Grade / 100 points

Students must ACTIVELY CONTRIBUTE during class in order to earn the associated points for participation. Late arrivals and lack of in-class focus will be recorded and deducted from the points available per equal halves of the semester. Absences are to be avoided wherever / whenever possible.

Working Course Schedule

Summer 2019

First Update: 26 June 2019

Second Update: 6 July 2019

Notes on the Schedule

  • I reserve the right to adjust the schedule as needed based on our progression over the semester.
  • Any schedule changes, if necessary, will be updated in Canvas and conveyed to students via updates (in person and electronically).

Tips on Participation and Reading

  • You MUST TAKE NOTES and PARTICIPATE IN ACTIVITIES in this class, ONLINE AND ONGROUND. If you do not, you will fail.
  • You MUST ALSO READ for this class – do NOT take the class if you don’t do the reading. For online students, read when instructed online. For on-ground students, read the NIGHT BEFORE each class period as I direct you.
  • Readings are abbreviated as follows:
    • Contexts Passages = Passage #s (look at the title of the passages – they are numbered) in The CONTEXTS Reader, 3rd Edition by Syed and Cohen. I’ve also included the (pages) for your cross reference.
    • Street Life = Street Life: Street Life: Poverty, Gangs, and a PhD by Victor Rios
    • PDF handout(s) = Additional readings supplied by the instructor and available on CANVAS / in class (depending on section)
    • Associated OER Chapters = The OER Online Textbooks Chapters associated with each Module/Topic. Remember this is an ADDITIONAL resource for your cross-reference.

Sociology in Action

Application of core themes and concepts will be made via various activities such as discussion, short essays, media analysis, and presentations.

  • Section 8638 (online) students will complete all such activities in Canvas and electronically.
  • Section 8697 (on-ground) students will complete activities in a variety of formats, including the Sociology Workbook, in class, AND online.

 

 Part One: What is Sociology as a Discipline?

Week One [starting June 17th]

Topics:

  • [WM] Welcome, Introduction and Course Overview Module
  • [M01] Module One – The Sociological Imagination
  • [M02] Module Two – Theory

Readings:

  • [WM] No assigned readings
  • [M01] PDF handout “The Sociological Imagination” by C Wright Mills (1959)
  • [M02] Context Passages #31, #32, and #33 (pages 213—233) (also available as PDFs)

 Sociology in Action:

  • Discussions, short essays, media analysis, assessments, presentations, etc.

Additional OER Resources (Optional, For Reference):

  • Chapter One – An Introduction to Sociology
  • Chapter Four – Society and Societal Interaction

Week Two [starting June 24th]

Topics:

  • [M03] Module Three – Methods
  • [M04] Module Four – Culture
  • [M05] Module Five –Socialization 

Readings:

  • [M03] Context Passage #5 (pages 33—41)
  • [M04] PDF handouts “Body Ritual Among the Nacirema” by Horace Miner (1956)
  • [M05] Context Passages #12 and #15 (pages 90—97) and (pages 113—121)

Sociology in Action:

  • Discussions, short essays, media analysis, assessments, presentations, etc.

Additional OER Resources (Optional, For Reference):

  • Chapter Two – Sociological Research
  • Chapter Three – Culture
  • Chapter Five – Socialization

Part Two:

How Can We Combat Social and Institutional Inequalities?

Week Three [starting July 1st]

Topics:

  • [M07] Module Seven – Stratification
  • [M08] Module Eight – Intersectionality & Health

Readings:

  • [M07] Context Passages #58, #59, and #60 (pages 417—428)
  • [M08] Context Passages #30 and #34 (pages 207—212) and (pages 234—241)

Sociology in Action:

  • Discussions, short essays, media analysis, assessments, presentations, etc.

Additional OER Resources (Optional, For Reference):

  • Chapter Nine – Social Stratification in the United States
  • Chapter Nineteen – Health and Medicine

Week Four [starting July 8th]

Topics:

  • [M09] Module Nine – Race and Ethnicity
  • [M10] Module Ten – Sex, Gender, and Sexuality
  • [M11] Module Eleven – Education

Readings:

  • [M09] Context Passages #17 THRU #21 (pages 133—156)
  • [M10] Context Passages #22 THRU #29 (pages 159—204)
  • [M11] Street Life: Poverty, Gangs and a PhD (Victor Rios 2011) (entire book/easy read)

Sociology in Action:

  • Discussions, short essays, media analysis, assessments, presentations, etc.

Additional OER Resources (Optional, For Reference):

  • Chapter Eleven – Race and Ethnicity
  • Chapter Twelve – Gender, Sex, and Sexuality
  • Chapter Sixteen – Education

 

Part Three:

How Are Societies Changing in a Globalized World?

Week Five [starting July 15th]

Topics:

  • [M12] Module Twelve – Politics
  • [M13] Module Thirteen – Economy and Marxism
  • [M16] Module Sixteen – Population, Urbanization, and the Environment

Readings:

  • [M12] PDF Handouts[2] The Power Elite (C Wright Mills); Why You Voted (A J Perrin)
  • [M13] PDF Handouts[2] Manifesto of Communist Party and Alienated Labor (Karl Marx)
  • [M16] Context Passages #63 THRU #67 (pages 449—475)

Sociology in Action:

Discussions, short essays, media analysis, assessments, presentations, etc.

Additional OER Resources (Optional, For Reference):

  • Chapter Seventeen – Government and Politics
  • Chapter Eighteen – Work and the Economy
  • Chapter Twenty – Population, Urbanization, and the Environment

Week Six [starting July 22nd]

Final Project and Presentations Week

  • Sociology in Action Activities Include:

    • Library Research and Written Analyses
    • Visual Presentations
    • Verbal Presentations

 

Universal Class Policies

For All Sociology Classes w/Dr. John

Grades & Course Assessment

  • Up to 1,000 points are available to each student, each semester, in each course in which they are enrolled. Also use and visit the “Grades” Section in Canvas to keep track of your grades.
  • Assignment descriptions and related points are detailed in various formats, including written and online versions (depending on the section), and are available on the course CANVAS site.
  • I cannot stress this enough: YOU earn YOUR grade through YOUR efforts.
  • To reiterate: Your grade is a reflection of the points you have earned. Period. End of Story.
  • The ratio of Final Points to Final Percentages (again – as earned by you) are as follows:

Grade

Percentage

Points

Grade

Percentage

Points

A

93% & above

930 – 1,000

D

69% – 74%

690 – 740

B

85% – 92%

850 – 920

F

68% – 0%

680 – 0

C

75% – 84%

750 – 840

 

Assignment Submissions

  • Any assignment listed on Canvas is to be submitted via Canvas as per the instructions of the assignment – NO EXCEPTIONS.
  • ALL ELECTRONIC submissions for short essays on Canvas MUST BE Word, PDF, or Text Entry – NO PAGES DOCUMENTS and NO LINKS to GOOGLE DOCS…EVER…
  • ALL submissions must be properly formatted – DOUBLE CHECK BEFORE YOU SUBMIT.
  • Any handwritten or hard copy work will be collected in class on the day it is due, no exceptions.
  • NEVER, EVER EMAIL ME AN ASSIGNMENT.

RE: LATE ASSIGNMENTS:

  • During Summer Sessions I do NOT allow for late submissions on assignments. Period.
  • NEVER, EVER EMAIL ME A LATE ASSIGNMENT.

Course Engagement

An undergraduate education is a collaborative effort built on a productive & engaged working relationship between Professor & Student. What does this mean for you?

YOUR Education Requires YOUR…

  • Preparation. Always read for class as directed.
  • Respect. Listen to others and learn from your mistakes. Take responsibility for your own success by doing the work, following directions, earning your own grade, and being fully present.
  • Focus. Put your electronic gadgets away and focus on what we are doing in class/in the modules: ask questions, challenge assumptions, engage in exercises, participate in discussions, read material, and complete assignments.

Nota Bene: DO NOT ENROLL IN THIS CLASS UNLESS YOU ARE PREPARED TO MEET THE COURSE EXPECTATIONS AS DETAILED.

Important Policies and Procedures (Alphabetically)

  • Absences & (Limited/No) Make Up Policy

    Make up assignments will be given ONLY in EXTREME circumstances such as a serious illness, religious observance, or college-sponsored absences. Supporting documents ARE required (doctor’s note, team schedules, etc.) and instructor decisions regarding approval are final. If you miss class for any other reason, make-up work/tests are NOT AVAILABLE. Also, I will not hold private lectures or make special accommodations for randomly/chronically absent students.
  • Academic Honesty and Integrity

    I fully expect you to maintain the highest standards of academic honesty and integrity during your academic career, and within this course in particular (refer to https://rightsresponsibilities.santarosa.edu/academic-integrity if you are not already familiar). Additionally, note my policy as instructor is to assign an “F” for any assignment or exam upon which academic dishonesty and/or plagiarism is evident. I will also report any such instances to the Academic Integrity Committee. Two or more instances WILL result in COURSE FAILURE.
  • Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

    If you have a documented disability, please provide the Authorization for Academic Accommodations (AAA letter) from the Disability Resources Department (DRD) as soon as possible. You can visit DRD on the Petaluma Campus in Jacobs Hall, Room 101 or on the Santa Rosa Campus in the Bertolini Student Center, 3rd Floor East. DON’T BE SHY – THERE’S NO SHAME IN GETTING WHAT YOU DESERVE!!!
  • Attendance and Participation

    We will cover distinct, unique material each class meeting/module so it is IMPERATIVE you make each and every class session. Your ACTIVE participation in class EACH SESSION is also fully expected. In other words, either make this class a priority or do not enroll.
  • Drop Policy

    As per SRJC’s official attendance policy, I reserve the right to drop any students missing more than 10% of class meetings until the deadline to drop (one [1] or more). After that point, I reserve the right to DROP and/or FAIL any students missing more than 10% of class meetings (TWO [2] or more). ALSO, if you decide to discontinue this course, it is your responsibility to officially drop it to avoid getting no refund (after 10% of course length), a W symbol (after 20%), or a grade (after 60%) (See Also Important Dates).
  • Emergency Evacuation Policy (anytime on campus and in class)

    In the case of an emergency, please follow my directions and do as I say, when I say. If an event requires our immediate evacuation, we will exit the classroom in a calm, orderly, and efficient manner, using the closest stairwell to exit the building. Once outside, we will gather in the open space in front of the library (one of several evacuation areas designated on campus) and await further instructions (see also https://petaluma.santarosa.edu/evacuation-areas for more information).
  • Instructor Email Announcements and Q&A Forum

    I will send many updates via email, so make sure you are regularly checking your school-related email account(s). I will also post messages on the “Instructor Announcements” page in Canvas. Canvas notifies students according to their preferred Notification Preferences as soon as the instructor creates an Announcement.
  • Important Dates for Summer 2019 Courses at SRJC can be viewed here

  • Pass – NoPass (P/NP)

    You may take this class P/NP. You must decide before the deadline, and add the option online with TLC or file the P/NP form with Admissions and Records. If taking Pass/No Pass you need at least 75% of the total class points and complete all exams and assignments to pass the class.
  • Standards of Conduct

    Students who register in SRJC classes are required to abide by the SRJC Student Conduct Standards. Violation of the Standards is basis for referral to the Vice President of Student Services or dismissal from class or from the College. See also https://student-conduct.santarosa.edu/.
  • Title IX Policy

    I do not discriminate, neither does SRJC, and neither should you: “The Sonoma County Junior College District does not discriminate on the basis of race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, ethnic group identification, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, genetic condition, marital status, sex, gender, gender identity, gender expression, genetic information or sexual orientation in any of its policies, procedures or practices; nor does the District discriminate against any employees or applicants for employment on the basis of their age. This nondiscrimination policy covers admission, access and treatment in District programs and activities including but not limited to academic admissions, financial aid, educational services and athletics and application for District employment” (https://titleix.santarosa.edu/).

Course Summary:

Date Details